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Simeon Ola Day

September 2

๐“๐ก๐ž ๐ฆ๐š๐ง ๐Ÿ๐ซ๐จ๐ฆ ๐€๐ฅ๐›๐š๐ฒ ๐œ๐ก๐จ๐ฌ๐ž ๐ญ๐จ ๐ ๐ข๐ฏ๐ž ๐ฎ๐ฉ ๐š ๐œ๐จ๐ฆ๐Ÿ๐จ๐ซ๐ญ๐š๐›๐ฅ๐ž ๐ฅ๐ข๐Ÿ๐ž ๐ญ๐จ ๐Ÿ๐ข๐ ๐ก๐ญ ๐Ÿ๐จ๐ซ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐œ๐จ๐ฎ๐ง๐ญ๐ซ๐ฒ. ๐†๐ž๐ง๐ž๐ซ๐š๐ฅ ๐’๐ข๐ฆ๐ž๐จ๐ง ๐Ž๐ฅ๐š ๐–๐š๐ฌ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐‹๐š๐ฌ๐ญ ๐†๐ž๐ง๐ž๐ซ๐š๐ฅ ๐ญ๐จ ๐’๐ฎ๐ซ๐ซ๐ž๐ง๐๐ž๐ซ ๐ญ๐จ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐€๐ฆ๐ž๐ซ๐ข๐œ๐š๐ง๐ฌ ๐ข๐ฆ๐ฉ๐ž๐ซ๐ข๐š๐ฅ๐ข๐ฌ๐ญ.
What drives a man to do heroic deeds? In the early years of the 20th century, the Philippines was host to an entire nation of heroes: farmers, workers, young men, and professionals, all of whom took up arms to fight for an ideal they shared. Many of them donโ€™t have names we remember or statues we commemorate them by. But we do remember them, collectively, as a nation.
Some heroes arenโ€™t so unfortunate. Simeon Ola was more than just another name on a long list of revolutionaries: He was the last.
Ola was a brave general on a long list of brave generals. With people such as Miguel Malvar in Batangas, Vicente Lukban in Samar, and Macario Sakay in Morong (now Rizal), itโ€™s hard to make your name stand out. But Ola from Albay managed to do just that.
And yet, Ola is somebody we remember but donโ€™t really know all that well. Beyond the surface, it seems that facts about Ola remain few and far in between.
We do have a lot of facts on Ola. He was born in 1865, in Guinobatan, Albay, to Vicente Ola and Apolonia Arboleda. He managed to rise to the position of teniente de cuardillos in his hometown, and he took Philosophy at the University of Nueva Caceres. But the call of Revolution in 1896 meant that he stopped his studies at 31 years old.
We know Ola used his position as teniente, as well as his close relationship with the parish priest to secure arms and ammunition. We know the battles he fought in: Camalig, under General Vito Bellarmino, where he attained the rank of captain; Binogsacan, right in Guinobatan; Oas, Macabugos, and many more.
And, we know Ola was the last general to formally surrender to the Americans. He held out until September 25, 1903, when the toll of constant raiding and the internment camps finally caught up with Ola and his men. We know that he, along with 28 of his men and officers, formally surrendered to the Americans after realizing it was impossible to win the war he fought so valiantly in.
What drives a man to do heroic deeds? In the early years of the 20th century, the Philippines was host to an entire nation of heroes: farmers, workers, young men, and professionals, all of whom took up arms to fight for an ideal they shared. Many of them donโ€™t have names we remember or statues we commemorate them by. But we do remember them, collectively, as a nation.
Some heroes arenโ€™t so unfortunate. Simeon Ola was more than just another name on a long list of revolutionaries: He was the last.

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Date:
September 2
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